• Virtual Conference on " PLASTICS PACKAGING WASTE MANAGEMENT: SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGICAL SOLUTION ( PART-2)- Deriving Value from Post- Consumer Multilayer Packaging ( MLP) Waste will be organised in association with M.G.University, Kottyam, Kerala on 21st October, 2021 at 3 PM.
  • On-Line Short term during ( 40 hours) Certificate Program on " Innovative Packaging and Sustainability", Organized by Bhaskaracharya College of Applied Sciences, University of Delhi with FIPS as Knowledge Partner. The course was held on 26th July to 28th September, 2021.
  • Virtual Conference on " Pathways to a Profitable Recycling Enterprise" ( Part-1) under the series conference on " Plastic Packaging waste Management" was held on 29th July,2021. Mr R. R.Rashmi, Rtd IAS, Former Chief Secretary, Manipur & Distinguished Fellow, TERI will be the Chief Guest.
  • FIPS in association with Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission (IPC), Govt of India will organize Virtual Conference on  "Patient friendly Packaging for Pharmaceuticals"  on 2nd August, 2021 at 3 PM. Dr Rajeev Singh Raghuvanshi, Secretary cum Scientific Director, IPC will be the Chief Guest to inaugurate this conference.

Trends in Fruit and Vegetable Packaging – a Review

fruit-and-vegetables-packaging

Processing and packaging are the two important phases of operations in the food industry. The fi nal phase is the packaging stage. A great deal of automation strategies are constantly being utilized in every phase of processing and packaging. The correct packaging enables processors to pack fresh and fresh-cut fruit and vegetables and extend their shelf life. The important parameters for this shelf life extension are temperature, moisture and a modifi ed atmosphere (oxygen, carbon dioxide and ethylene). If both temperature and packaging are optimal, ageing of fruit and vegetables can be slowed down signifi cantly. This paper is concentrate on trends in fruits and vegetables packaging.

Introduction

Fruit and vegetables play an important role in healthy nutrition and are high on the list of consumer priorities. However the major obstacle of purchasing ready-to-eat fresh-cut fruits and vegetables is their short shelf life, leading to quick degeneration and decomposition of the product and undesirable look and negative palatability. Fruit and vegetables are living products undergoing a ripening and at the end an ageing process, in which the plant tissue is broken down. The products undergo various biological processes, which also continue after the products have been harvested. For example there is wide variation in respiration rates (Table 1) and ethylene production (Table 2) between fruits and vegetables.

Conventional packs

It is essential to minimise physical damage to fresh produce in order to obtain optimal shelf-life. The use of suitable packaging is vital in this respect (Thompson, 1996). The most
common form of packaging in this sector is the use of the fi – breboard carton; however, for most produce, additional internal packaging, for example tissue paper wraps, trays, cups or pads, is required to reduce damage from abrasion. For very delicate fruits, smaller packs with relatively few layers of fruits are used to reduce compression damage. Moulded trays may be used which physically separate the individual piece of produce. Individual fruits may also be wrapped separately in tissue or waxed paper. This improves the physical protection and also reduces the spread of disease organisms within a pack.

Original content

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